Parthenocissus

Common name: Virginia creeper

Parthenocissus quinquefolia is a vigorous deciduous clinging creeper rather than a climber, therefore it requires to be trained up pergolas, walls, fences etc.

Its creeping habit also makes it a useful ground cover plant, and because it will tolerate poor soil it is useful for covering unsightly areas.

They can grow to a height / spread of 12 metres (40ft)

Inconspicuous yellow/green flowers are produced between May and July, and these are followed by dull-blue berries.

These berries are toxic and can cause an upset stomach if ingested.

The foliage is bright green in summer and are particularly attractive in autumn, when the foliage turns brilliant crimson and purple.

Cultivation

Week 18: Place seedlings sown the previous year in a nursery bed, and grow on until planting out time.

Week 32: Take cuttings from semi-ripe lateral shoots and root them at a temperature of 14°- 16°C (57°- 60°F)

Week 40: sow seed in pots/trays of seed compost and germinate at a temperature of 10°- 12°C (50°- 54°F)

When the seedlings have produced several true leaves, prick them out singly into 70mm (3”) pots of potting compost and grow them on in a cold frame.

Week 42: Layer suitable long laterals.

Leave them for about a year to root, then sever them from the parent plant, and plant out where required.

Week 44: Take 300mm (12”) hardwood cuttings and insert them to half there length in a protected nursery bed.

Week 45: Plant out pot-grown seedlings/cuttings at the base of the supporting structure e.g. wall, trellis, pergola, in fertile, well-drained soil

Enrich the soil if necessary, particularly at the base of a wall, with copious amounts of organic matter.

Pinch out the growing points, and support the young growths with split cane / sticks until they become self-clinging.

Note: young bare rooted plants do not transplant readily.

Week 45> Prune as necessary to keep it under control, particularly at eaves level to prevent it growing under the tiles/slates and into the roof space.





Top of the Page